Welcome to the October 2008 issue of "Smart Traveler". The newsletter with tips and information to help make your traveling smoother.


What Not To Pack

 The goal is simple: to visit your destination without running out of clean socks and without a suitcase so stuffed that you emit strange animal sounds trying to heave it into the overhead compartment. But if only it were that easy! If you've struggled over whether you need a raincoat for your trip to Cairo (just in case!) or wondered how many guidebooks is too many, you're certainly not alone. Packing for a trip is often a struggle to distinguish what we want to bring from what we need to bring.

When we're forced to choose between our favorite things, we're sometimes tempted to just bring it all and to hell with it -- but overpacking can cost more than just extra suitcase space and a free hand. Checking more than one bag, exceeding your airline's weight limit or even checking a bag at all can cost you. Many Airlines, for example, charges passengers a $15 fee each way for checking a piece of luggage, and many airlines charge $25-50 for a second checked bag. And bringing home souvenirs is impossible when you can't even remember how you managed to pack your bag so tightly in the first place.

Below is a list of what most travelers shouldn't pack, along with tips and ideas on how to pack better. Everyone's packing style is different and we all have our own travel needs, so before you turn red at the idea of leaving behind your beloved toothbrush sanitizer, please remember that these are only suggestions. Leave out a few of these items on your next trip -- you'll enjoy traveling with a lighter load, and we promise you won't miss a thing!

Don't Pack Your Entire Beauty Routine
If you use eight different products to tame your wild curls or have an elaborate face-washing regimen down to a science, let loose a bit when you travel instead of carrying an army of beauty products with you across the globe. Trust us -- you won't look like a cave woman in your vacation pictures if you use a shampoo/conditioner combo for a few nights. If you're adventurous enough to leave home and explore an exotic destination, we bet you can also handle leaving behind a few hair products.

Top Tips:

  If you are staying at a major chain hotel that will offer complimentary toiletries -- use them! Don't bring your own 24-ounce shampoo and conditioner bottles to the hotel and then stuff the hotel ones in your suitcase to take home. If you don't use them on the road, you'll probably never use them at home.

  There are lots of products that have multiple uses. Opt for a shampoo/conditioner combo. Find a moisturizer with SPF. Let your moisturizing body wash double as a shaving cream. Share your shampoo, soap or toothpaste with your traveling partner.

  Lose the bulky containers. Instead, try zip-top bags. We stuff everything we can into them, including hair products, lotions, cotton balls and even sunscreen. (If you're paranoid that a bag will puncture and deposit its messy contents onto your black silk dress, put all of your liquid-filled baggies in a large plastic grocery bag -- and be sure not to pack it next to any fishing rods or freshly sharpened pencils.)

Don't Pack Your Jewelry and Valuables
Rule of thumb -- if you can't imagine living without your grandmother's wedding ring or your expensive Movado watch, it's best not to cart it overseas, where tourists are common targets for thieves and luggage often gets lost in transit. You may think you look like an icon of style, but to criminals and con-artists you appear as an icon of opportunity. It's also wise not to look like a million bucks if you're trying to bargain with the locals, and sparkly jewelry may set you apart from the natives when you're trying to fit in.

Top Tips:

  If you must bring your fancy jewelry, keep it in the hotel safe except for special occasions such as dinner in a nice restaurant -- and be sure it's covered by appropriate insurance. Most homeowners' policies will not cover jewelry if it's lost or stolen while traveling, so you may need to purchase a separate policy.

  Pack any valuables you buy while on your trip (and any of your own that you decide to bring) in your carry-on. Checked bags can sometimes disappear into the black hole of lost airline luggage.

Don't Pack More Than One Guidebook
Some of us are practically addicted to these little gems of information, but we don't need to remind you how heavy a stack of books can be. One good, comprehensive guidebook should do the trick.

Top Tips:

  If you are convinced that each of your 11 guidebooks offers unique and vital information about your destination, cart them to your office or the library and photocopy your favorite sections.

  Lonely Planet recently introduced mix-and-match guidebook chapters that can be downloaded a la carte on its Web site -- so you only have to pay for (and pack!) the sections you need.

  Research the location of an Internet cafe or two at your destination before you leave. If you are afraid of not having access to travel information during your trip, you can always find it on the Web.

Don't Pack More Clothes Than You Need
We know ... this one's a no-brainer. But deciding which clothes to bring is sometimes one of the most difficult parts of packing. Clothes tend to make up the bulk of most travelers' suitcases -- and reducing the number of outfits you bring can lighten your load significantly. No one wants to run out of clean underwear in the middle of the Brazilian rain forest, but we think that travelers can find a comfortable balance between wearing the same stinky jeans and T-shirt the whole trip and changing their outfit three times each day like a celebrity.

Top Tips:

  If you're going on, say, a seven-day trip, spend a week before you leave keeping track of everything you wear. Make a list, or if you learn better with visual aids, keep these items together in a laundry basket. Then figure out which items you can do without.

  Bring clothes in neutral colors that you can mix and match, and only pack shoes that can be worn with multiple outfits.

  Check the weather at your destination before you leave and pack accordingly. If the weather deviates significantly from the forecast, you can always buy a sweater or rain poncho and keep it as a souvenir.

  Many travel supply companies sell small packets of laundry detergent (you can also find these at a laundromat). It only takes a few minutes to wash your clothes in your hotel sink and hang them on a hanger to dry. When you wake up the next morning ... freshly washed clothes!

Don't Pack Unnecessary Gadgets
This section applies to you if you have ever packed items such as nightlights, shoe horns, portable DVD players, book lights, coffee makers, fire-safety smoke hoods, hotel-door alarm systems, toothbrush sanitizers or electronic language translators, never to actually use them on your trip. The definition of "necessary" varies from one traveler to the next, so it's important to ask yourself if you will really need your ocean-sound machine to get to sleep each night before you stuff it in your bursting suitcase.

Top Tips:

  If you are a travel gadget addict, pick one or two that you just have to have and save the others for a future trip.

  Keep in mind that some gadgets may call for more room in your luggage than you'd expect; to keep them running, you may need to pack things like spare batteries, chargers, or electrical adapters and converters (for overseas travel).


Don't Pack Things You Can Buy There
Yes, things you can buy at home are often more expensive overseas. This is especially the case in Europe, so a traveler who's flying across the pond may want to pack extra everything in the interest of saving money. But again -- think of the luggage weight fees. Simple items that you may need but can probably live without, like aspirin, nail polish remover, extra razors or additional reading material for the plane ride back, can usually be purchased at drug and convenience stores in many destinations.

Top Tips:

  Remember that if you decide to buy a lot of your items abroad, you will have to create room in your suitcase to cart them back home. Buy sample-sized items if you can to save space and money.

  Instead of bringing a virtual library of reading material with you, buy magazines and newspapers at the airport. Picking out what you want to read will give you something to do as you wait, and you can recycle the items so you don't have to lug them back with you.

        
Flu Shots On The Fly

A few years ago if you wanted a flu shot at an airport, you'd have to first locate the rare airport with an on-site medical clinic. Then you'd have to go find the clinic, which was usually tucked away somewhere off in a corner of the airport. Not many people took time for that.

Then the folks at the UIC Medical Center at O'Hare International Airport tried an experiment. They set up kiosks offering flu shots out on the concourses, near the restaurants, shops and gates. Flu shots on the fly, even priced a bit higher than pharmacy flu shots, turned out to be a big hit with travelers. Convenience was the big factor. "Last year," says O'Hare's UIC Medical Center director Dr. John Zautcke, "we gave more than 5,000 flu shots. This year, we expect to give close to 6,000 vaccinations. So it's clear that it's a good thing to do."

It's such a good thing to do that the service is spreading. Last year, travelers could get flu shots in or near a dozen or so airports stretching from New York to San Francisco. This year, the list of airports already hosting flu shot kiosks, or planning to start doing so shortly, has expanded to about two dozen. Included are Des Moines International, Cleveland Hopkins, Louisville International, Memphis International and Akron-Canton. Some airports are hiring outside companies to operate and staff the flu-shot kiosks, others are partnering with local hospitals or health departments. And at least two airports are once again planning to offer flu shots for free.

Last January, the San Diego International Airport partnered with a local non-profit organization, the Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP), to offer free flu and pneumonia shots to travelers, airport employees and anyone who stopped by. During the one day event, more than 600 people got vaccinated. This year, they'll do it again — on January 16th.

Free flu shots, about 2000 of them, will also be available this year in Phoenix, at the Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) from January 26 -30. It's the third year in a row the airport will join with the Arizona Department of Health Services, Maricopa County Department of Public Health, and The Arizona Partnership for Immunization (TAPI) to offer free flu vaccines to travelers as well as to airport and airline employees. The airport's Claire Stern says the project started when local health agencies realized they had an excess of vaccine. Now, it's a community tradition. And while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges everyone to think about getting their flu shot early, January is not too late. "The flu season can last as late as May," says Sky Harbor's Stern, "so getting a vaccine in January can still be very beneficial."

   
Trip Tactics

How to protect your belongings on the road.
 
It’s hard to say how common theft is at hotels, but it does happen. Rather than leave security entirely in the hands of management, take these precautions to make sure you don’t lose your shirt—or watch or money or laptop.

 

     When checking in to a hotel, read the fine print on your room registration and in the room itself: Most hotels are not liable for anything that happens to your belongings.

     If leaving your luggage to be stored, make sure it will be in a locked room.

     To deter thieves, make it appear that your room is occupied by leaving the TV on and putting a “Do Not Disturb” sign on the door.

     Avoid broadcasting your room number. If a desk clerk announces it, request a room change.

     Use the room safe—or ,better yet, the hotel’s own safe—for valuables.

     Buy a security cable so you can lock your laptop to a piece of furniture so it’s secure even when you’re not there.

     If something is stolen, don’t just alert the manager but contact the local police to file a report; you’ll likely need it if you want to seek redress with your insurance company; many homeowners’ policies cover losses on the road. However, according to the Insurance Industry Institute some companies limit the amount of such “off-premises coverage” to 10 percent of the insurance you have for all of your possessions. Expensive items like jewelry may require a rider to insure to their full value. As a further safeguard, you may want to carry documentation for items like cameras, video equipment, or a computer, in case something should happen to them while you’re away.

   
Travel Tools: New Fee Chart

By now, everyone knows about the airlines' new fees for checked baggage, snacks and drinks, all of which used to be complimentary. Below is a helpful chart of the new fees that was accurate at time of publication.

NOTE: Check with your airline before arriving at the airport. These fees can change overnight.

Airline

Reservation by Phone
(per person)
 
1st Checked Bag Fee
(each-way)
2nd Checked Bag Fee
(each-way)
Seat Selection /
Priority / Leg Room
American
 
$20 $15 $25 None
Continental
 
$15 $15 $25 None
Delta
 
$25 Free $50 None
Northwest
 
$20 $15 $25 $5 - $35
United
 
$25 $15 $50 $14 - $109
US Airways
 
$25 - $35 $15 $25 $5 - $30
AirTran
 
$15 Free
 
$10 - $205 $6 - $20
Alaska
 
$15 Free
 
$25
 
None
Frontier
 
$25 $15 $25 None
JetBlue
 
$15 Free $20 $10 - $30
Southwest
 
Free Free
 
Free (3+ $25) $10 - $30
Spirit
 
Free (no sale fares) $15 - $25 $25 $5 - $15
Midwest
 
$25 Free $20
 
$65
Hawaiian
 
$10 - $25 $15 $25 None
Go
 
Free $10 $17 None
ExpressJet
 
Free Free Free None
Virgin America
 
$10 Free $25 $50 - $100
Allegiant
 
$10 - $15 ea/way $15 - $25 $15 - $255 $11 - $13
Sun Country
 
$10 Free $25  N/A

 


 

Airline
Beverage/
Snack Packet
Meal
 
Alcohol Oversize Bag Fee
(each-way)
Overweight Bag Fee
(each-way)
American
 
Free/none
 
$3 - $10 $6 $150 $50 - $100
Continental
 
Free Free2 $5 $100 $50
Delta
 
Free
 
$4 - $10 $5 - $6 $150 $80 - $150
Northwest
 
Free/$3 - $5
 
$7 - $10 $5 $100 $50
United
 
Free
 
$5 - $73 $6 $125 $125
US Airways
 
$2/$58
 
$78 $7 $100 $50 - $100
AirTran Free None $6 $29 - $69 $29 - $69
Alaska
 
Free
 
$5 $5 $50 - $75 $50
Frontier Free $3 $5 $75 $75
JetBlue
 
Free
 
None $5 $75 $50 - $100
Southwest
 
Free ($3 Energy)
 
None $4 $50 $25 - $50
Spirit
 
$2 - $3/$2 - $5
 
None $5 $100 - $150 $50 - $100
Midwest
 
Free (Cookie)
 
$6 - $11 $5
 
$80
 
$50 - $65
Hawaiian
 
Free
 
Free $6 $160 - $360 $50
Go $1.5/None
 
None $2.5 - $3.5 $25 $25 - 50
ExpressJet Free
 
Free $1 - $3 $50 $50
Virgin America
 
Free
 
$6 - $8 $5 - $6 $50 $50 - $100
Allegiant
 
$2/$2-$4
 
$4 $5 may apply may apply
Sun Country
 
Free
 
Free $5 $60 $60

 


 


Airline

Travel w/ Pets
(each-way)
Unaccompanied Minors
(per flight)
Curbside
Check-In
Non-Refundable
Ticket Change Fee
American
 
$100 - $150
 
$100 Free $150
Continental
 
$125
 
$75 - $100 Free $150
Delta
 
$150 - $275
 
$100 $3 $100
Northwest
 
$80 - $359
 
$75 - $100 $2 $150
United
 
$125 - $250
 
$99
 
$2 $150
US Airways
 
$100
 
$100 $2 $150
AirTran
 
$69
 
$39 - $59 Free $75
Alaska
 
$100
 
$75 $2 $50 - $75
Frontier
 
$100 - $200
 
$50 n/a $150
JetBlue
 
$100
 
$75 $2 $100
Southwest
 
No Pets
 
Free Free Free
Spirit
 
$85
 
$75 $2 $80 - $90
Midwest
 
$100
 
$50 - $100 Free $100
Hawaiian
 
$35 - $175
 
$35 - $95 n/a $150
Go
 
$25
 
$25 n/a $20
ExpressJet
 
$50
 
$50 n/a $50
Virgin America
 
$100 $75 n/a $75
Allegiant
 
$100
 
$100 n/a $504
Sun Country $75
 
$50 Free $75 - $100


Miscellaneous Fees
– JetBlue now charges $7 for a blanket and pillow (yours to keep)


Remember: Without a travel agent you're on your own


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